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EAZA and Wild Elephant Conservation

The European Association of Zoos and Aquariums (EAZA) is not the solution to ending miserable lives of captive animals, teaching children about wild animal nature or making real contributions to preventing their extinction.

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A Vietnamese Elephant in France

The first two elephants at the European Elephant Sanctuary in France have lived for decades in small zoos in France and the Czech Republic without the company of other elephants. In the wild they would have lived in large family groups. Solitary confinement causes elephants significant trauma. Bringing two solitary elephants together who would most likely not socialize with each other in the wild, rapidly form close friendships in captivity provided they have the space and freedom of a sanctuary to rediscover at least part of their elephant nature.

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European Elephant Sanctuary

Gandhi's arrival at Elephant Haven in France on October 14 of this year represents an important milestone for reducing the number of captive elephants in European facilities not being equipped to take care of elephants' needs.

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Circus Owners against French Government Ban of Wild Animal Acts

The general public has long recognized that trucking wild animals from town to town and forcing them to perform unnatural tricks can only be achieved by inflicting fear through cruel punishment.  27 European countries have banned wild animals in circuses. In November of 2019 Paris was the latest of 384 French communities to ban animal acts in circuses.

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Elephant Haven, European Elephant Sanctuary

During a conference in Hermanus last year, elephant experts from Kenya, Zimbabwe, the United Staes, Great Britain, the Netherlands and South Africa attempted to work out guidelines for dealing with elephants in captivity. In conclusion they condemned the capture and confinement of elephants. They called on zoos to release and reintegrate elephants into the wild and when this is not possible to relocate them to sanctuaries where they can live a more natural life.

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Corona Virus and Thai Elephants

Some captive working elephants in Thailand will be better off due to shrinking tourist revenues caused by the corona virus pandemic. And maybe, just maybe this could be a post-pandemic solution for most of Thailand's working elephants and their mahouts.

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The Elephant Conservation Center in Laos

Encouraging news from Laos: The Elephant Conservation Center in the Lao People's Democratic Republic includes a number of innovative features that could be used to create successful conservation projects in other Asian countries.

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The Elephant Orphanage in Kenya

The David Sheldrik Wildlife Trust includes the most successful elephant orphanage in Africa, having successfully raised 244 elephants and hand-raised 17 rhinos. Rehabilitated orphans living in the wild have given birth to 30 babies of their own. Saving orphaned elephant babies makes little sense without conserving the natural habitat they are meant to be re-introduced to. Among other projects, this involves anti-poaching activities, community outreach and ever-ready veterinary units.

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Nosey the Circus Elephant

How a wild born elephant from Zimbabwe, traveling by air with 63 other orphaned baby elephants to Florida, where she is part of a misguided conservation attempt that failed after only two years, then being sold to a solitary confinement situation to an abusive family circus and finally ending up at the Elephant Sanctuary in Tennessee, is perhaps a fitting story with a happy ending for this last post at the end of 2018:

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Elephants in sanctuaries

How do sanctuaries differ from other facilities keeping captive elephants? First and foremost, elephants being brought to a sanctuary will receive veterinary care to mitigate many of the chronic diseases frequently encountered by elephants coming from zoos and circuses, such as overweight, inappropriate nutrition, tuberculosis, infected foot pads due to being forced to stand extended periods in their own urine and fecal matter, tooth decay, injuries from beatings and sharp instruments used to instill obedience and arthritis being aggravated by being forced to perform, to mention a few. While the physical ills in all their severity are difficult enough to treat they are nothing compared to the mental injuries inflicted on elephants during decades of ill treatments by their keepers.

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